BEFORE GARVEY! HENRY MCNEAL TURNER AND THE FIGHT FOR REPARATIONS, EMIGRATION AND BLACK RIGHTS

AMANDA BERRY SMITH

Black and white rendering of Smith

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division, The New York Public Library. “Amanda Smith,” 1922. New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Amanda Berry Smith was born enslaved in Long Green, Maryland. Smith’s father purchased her and several other family members’ freedom from slavery before he died. Smith became associated with the Holiness movement but remained connected to the AME church. Smith was an independent itinerant preacher and never ordained by any denomination. Through her powerful preaching, Smith traveled to India, Ireland, Scotland, England, and Africa. Smith founded an orphanage and school for Black children in Harvey, Illinois. Smith wrote her biography, An Autobiography: The Story of the Lord’s Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith, the Colored Evangelist, published in 1893.

Scan image of newspaper The Christian Recorder

Mrs. Alice S. Felts. “WOMEN IN THE CHURCH.” The Christian Recorder, 18 Feb. 1886. Accessible Archives © 2016 Accessible Archives Inc.

The Christian Recorder published a letter written by Mrs. Alice S. Felts who vehemently defended the place of women in the church. She also lauds Bishop Turner for ordaining Sarah Hughes and believes he should have received more support and blessing.