" /> Prosperity and Politics: Taking Stock of Black Wealth and the 1843 Convention | An exhibit in the collection of the Colored Conventions Project

PROSPERITY AND POLITICS:
TAKING STOCK OF BLACK WEALTH AND THE 1843 CONVENTION

By 1843, free and fugitive Black delegates and attendees had gathered at national colored citizens conventions for over a decade to organize for social, political, educational, and labor rights. On August 15, fifty-eight delegates and a lively audience convened at Park Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, New York to consider “their moral and political condition as American citizens.” Undoubtedly, the 1843 National Colored Convention is best known for the Black reverend and activist, Henry Highland Garnet’s speech, “Address to the Slaves of the United States” and the heated debates about slave insurrection that ensued.

Credits

Curator: Sarah Patterson, PhD candidate in English and Co-Coordinator, the Colored Conventions Project.

Undergraduate Researchers: Nathan Nikolic, Gwen Meredith, Caleb Trotter, Gerti Wilson, and Ariana Woodson.

Cover image Dr. Charles Fraser and Dr. Sarah Loguen-Fraser’s pharmacy in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Photo courtesy of Department of Historical Collections, Health Sciences Library, SUNY Upstate Medical Library.

Special thanks to Gale, a Cengage Company, and Accessible Archives Inc.® for granting permission for the use of the materials from 19th Century U.S. Newspaper and African American Newspapers: The 19th Century.

The Colored Conventions Project works with teaching partners and their students to create digital content on the rich history of Black political organizing in the nineteenth-century. Visit our Teaching Partners page to browse the curriculum and find information on becoming a teaching partner.