Teaching the Colored Conventions

Seeking Records Classroom Module

The Colored Conventions movement generated a rich and varied documentary record—from the minutes of the proceedings themselves and the coverage they received in newspapers, to the vigorous debates their participants engaged in and the legislative petitions they created to advocate for Black rights. The process of bringing the long and dynamic history of the Colored Conventions to digital life is one of archival recovery and innovative partnership. The Seeking Records Classroom Module invites participating faculty and students to join us in the exciting process of locating historical documents related to the Colored Conventions and presenting them to the public for the very first time.

How to Become a Teaching Partner

After several years of classroom implementation, we are taking the 2019-2020 school year to revamp the Seeking Records Classroom Module. We look forward to presenting the new and improved module in the near future. Reach us at info@coloredconventions.org if you have any questions about our classroom module.

Research Resources and Classroom Modules 

As part of our ongoing effort to bring the buried history of nineteenth-century Black organizing to digital life, the Colored Conventions Project team has developed a range of research-based teaching materials to engage faculty, students, and the general public in the rich documentary record of the Colored Conventions movement. CCP scholars and librarians have curated sample writing assignments, research guides, educational resources, and an innovative classroom teaching module, all designed to encourage investigation into the themes and debates that arose for the Black men and women who organized, attended, and supported the Colored Conventions. Reach us at ColoredConventions@udel.edu to learn more about our teaching materials and classroom module.

Teaching Guides to Use in K-12 and AP/College Classes

In spring 2021, the CCP Curriculum Committee released 16 teaching guides that can be taught in conjunction with the volume The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century (2021), edited by P. Gabrielle Foreman, Jim Casey, and Sarah Lynn Paterson.

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Black Organizing, Print Advocacy, and Collective Authorship: The Long History of the Colored Conventions Movement

P. Gabrielle Foreman

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Where Did They Eat? Where Did They Stay? Interpreting Material Culture of Black Women’s Domesticity in the Context of the Colored Conventions

Psyche Williams-Forson

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Flights of Fancy: Black Print, Collaboration, and Performances in “An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America (Rejected by the National Convention, 1843)”

Derrick R. Spires

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The Organ of the Whole: Colored Conventions, the Black Press, and the Question of National Authority

Benjamin Fagan

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As the True Guardians of Our Interests: The Ethos of Black Leadership and Demography at Antebellum Colored Conventions

Sarah Lynn Patterson

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Gender Politics and the Manual Labor College Initiative at National Colored Conventions in Antebellum America

Kabria Baumgartner

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Further Silence upon Our Part Would Be an Outrage: Bishop Henry McNeal Turner and the Colored Conventions Movement

Andre E. Johnson

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None but Colored Testimony against Him: The California Colored Convention of 1855 and the Origins of the First Civil Rights Movement in California

Jean Pfaelzer

North American Teaching Partners

Kate Adams
Tulane University
M. Christine Anderson
Xavier University
Kimberly Blockett
Penn State Brandywine
RJ Boutelle
Florida Atlantic University
Mary Chapman
University of British Columbia
Anna Mae Duane
University of Connecticut
Erica Armstrong Dunbar
Rutgers University
Benjamin Fagan
Auburn University
Sharla M. Fett
Occidental College
Charlie Gleek
Florida Atlantic University
Laura Helton
University of Delaware
Josh Honn
Northwestern University
Kate Masur
Northwestern University
Monica L. Mercado
Colgate University
Joycelyn Moody
University of Texas
Kristin Moriah
Queen's University
Lynnette Young Overby
University of Delaware
Jean Pfaelzer
University of Delaware
Selena Sanderfer
Western Kentucky University
Leslie A. Schwalm
University of Iowa
Matthew Taylor
Northwestern University
Toniesha L. Taylor
Texas Southern University
Shirley Moody-Turner
Pennsylvania State University
Sarah Wasserman
University of Delaware
Ivy Wilson
Northwestern University
Rafia Zafar
Washington University

The Colored Conventions Project appreciates the support of:

 

The Colored Conventions Project was launched & cultivated at the University of Delaware from 2012-2020.