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Colored Convention of the Texas Farmers Association

1880TX-State-Dallas_Report_Galveston-Daily-News_1880-02-18_cropped-page1-6.pdf

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The committee on nominations reported the following delegates as suitable members of the board of directors, who were, on motion, voted for separately and as a whole, with only one dissenting vote: W.R. Carson, A. R. Griggs, Clem Peirce, Albert Gray, S. H. Smothers, J. H. Brenham, R. W. Cook, T. V. B. Davis, J. C. Ceasar, W. T. Templin, J. A. Jackson, S. H. Smith, G. W. Brown, A. S. Richardson. Collins, of Kauffman, stated that he had been requested by 150 colored men in Louisiana, on the eve of emigrating to Kansas, to inquire as to the advantages of the country to be colonized by the blacks of Texas, and if the scheme included the colored people of other states. These people are possessed of means sufficient to purchase lands and improve them, and being fixed in their purpose to emigrate from poor lands to Caddo parish, will go to Kansas and invest their capital, unless some authorized movement was made to invite them into the proposed colony. Davis, of Navarro, moved the the board of directors go immediately to work to encourage their immigration to Texas by providing labor for the Louisianians until next fall, when the Panhandle colony will be open to settlement. Amotsy, of Dallas, offered a resolution to the effect that the board of directors meet at once and appoint agents to go to the Panhandle to select lands, and the association publish an address inviting the colored people from all sections of the south to come and take hold. Adopted amid cheers and cries of, "Good! "That's it." "Onward!" Without reconsidering the vote, Griggs, of Dallas, moved that the convention elect at once the agents to canvass the lands to be colonized. Carried, and S. H. Smothers and W. R. Carson were elected by acclamation. The committee appointed to consider the proposition of Capt. W. G. Veal offering 70,000 acres of land on the Pecos river at $1 per acre reported favorably, provided the agents to examine the land reported favorably. Carried with a hurrah. A letter from Dr. A. Ary, of Clarksville, Tennesse, who owns sixty thousand acres of land in the state to be colonized by colored Tennesseeans, was read. A paragraph in it, suggesting the necessity of the Texas association publishing a newspaper in the interest of the colony, and proposing to move his paper, the Citizen and Journal of Industry, from Clarksville to Dallas, Texas, fired the convention anew. During the bitter debate it became manifest that the directory was afraid of the action of the convention, and the latter was suspicious of a contemplated foul deal on the part of directory. A motion was made that the latter be referred to the directory. A substitute was offered that the convention dispose of the letter without referring it. After long and acrimonious debate the substitute was lost and the original motion prevailed.

Adjourned for supper.

[NOTE.—Dr. Ary accompanied his offer of moving his paper to Texas with the distinct avowal that he had ample means to run his paper, and its republication would be independent of any pecuniary aid from the association

On reassembling the following officers were

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