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Proceedings of the Iowa State Colored Convention : held in the city of Des Moines ; Wednesday and Thursday, February 12th and 13th, 1868.

1868IA.5.pdf

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332

STATE CONVENTIONS, 1868

Evening Session.

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment at 7 1/2 o'clock, P.M., the President in the chair.

Prayer by Rev. Davis.

Roll called. Minutes read and approved.

The Convention resolved itself into a committee of the whole on the state of the Union, and short speeches of 10 minutes were allowed, except to Rev. J. W. Malone, who was allowed 30 minutes. The following gentlemen spoke: Rev. J. W. Malone. Rev. J. Bass, C. Montgomery, T. A. Bush, S. D. Wheeler, Rev. P. C. Cooper, and others.

After which the Convention adjourned sine die, the members all passing around, after prayer, shaking hands and singing, "Blow ye the trumpet, blow!"

J. W. MALONE, President.

ALEX. CLARK, Secretary.

We, your Committee on Printing, present this as a true copy of the minutes of the Secretary.

In behalf of the colored people we take pleasure in returning thanks to the "State Register," Davenport "Gazette," Muscatine "Journal," and other papers, for publishing the address.

Alex. Clark.

P. C. Cooper.

T. L. Carter.

We, your Committee on Address, will here state that the "Daily State Register," in printing the Address, makes it read: "To every true, honest, liberty-loving citizen of Iowa do the colored men of your proud commonwealth appeal for sympathy and aid in learning those rights and privileges which belong to us as freemen." Instead of the word "learning" it should have been "securing," which was according to the manuscript. This error obscures the meaning of the sentence, hence we requested a correction to be made, which request was complied with, as follows:

Correction.--Mr. Alex. Clark, of Muscatine, writes us a note stating that a typograghical mistake occurred in the Iowa Colored Men's Appeal, which we published the other day. Instead of saying, "the colored men appeal for sympathy and aid in LEARNING those rights," &c., it should have read, "in SECURING those rights," &c.--State Register, Feb. 20th.

ADDRESS OF THE COLORED STATE CONVENTION TO THE PEOPLE OF IOWA

IN BEHALF OF THEIR ENFRANCHISEMENT

PREPARED AND DELIVERED TO THE CONVENTION BY A. CLARK, CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON ADDRESS, FEB. 13TH, 1868

To the People of Iowa: To every true, honest and liberty-loving citizen of Iowa do the colored men of your proud commonwealth appeal for sympathy and aid in securing those rights and privileges which belong to us as freemen. Having established our claim to the proud title of American soldiers and shared in the glories won by the deeds of the true men of our own color, will you not heed and hear our appeal? We appeal to the sense of justice of the Legislature and of the people of our own State, for those rights of citizenship without which our well-earned freedom is but a shadow. We ask no privilege; we simply ask you to recognize our claim to manhood by giving to us that right without which we have no power to defend ourselves from unjust legislation, and no voice in the government we have endeavored to preserve. Being men, we claim to be of that number comprehended in the Declaration of Independence, and who are entitled not only to life, but to equal rights in the pursuit and securing of happiness and in the choice of those who are to rule over us. Deprived of this, we are forced to pay taxes without representation; to submit, without appeal, to laws however offensive, without a

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