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State Colored Men's Convention

1873LA-State_New-Orleans_Report__1873-11-18_excerpt-4.pdf

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Current Saved Transcription [history]

self-possessed manner characteristic of the gentleman, Senator Pinchback spoke as follows:

SPEECH OF SENATOR PINCHBACK

Mr. President and gentleman of the convention—The forcibleness of our utterances depend, among other considerations, largely upon the propriety of the same. He who speaks in harmony with the occasion can not speak without force.

Governed by this maxim, I would in my remarks make only such suggestions as are pertinent to the purposes for which this convention is assembled.

You are here, gentlemen, specifically to strengthen the existing State government of Louisiana, and thereby more effectually guard your political rights.

A speech, therefore, somewhat political in its tone is allowable; but there are other matters, not political, which may be furthered and should be furthered by your assembling.

Political

A retrospect of our political affairs is encouraging.

More than a year ago the people of this State, at the polls, indicated the officers who should constitute the government of the State for the current term, and who, under the constitution, should be, in the interest of the whole people, charged with the enactment and administration of the laws. I, with others among you, took part in the initial organization of the present State government.

It was born in a storm, and has lived and grown strong, though surrounded by turbulence, because possessed of the innate strength that right always gives, and further, supported by the strong arms and patriotic impulses of the Republicans of Louisiana. Twelve months ago it was a babe in swaddling clothes; to-day its healthy infancy has developed into vigorous manhood, and supported by the majority of the masses and in harmony with the national authority, the present State administration of Louisiana bids fair to be an eminent success. .

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