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National Convention at New Orleans, LA

1872LA-National-reports-page27.pdf

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Current Saved Transcription [history]

Pending the appeal,Mr. Ruffin, of Massachusetts, obtained the floor, and spoke at length, eulogizing the course of Mr. Sumner, and depicting in choice oratory the noble part he had taken in defense of the rights of the down-trodden colored people of this country in the past; denouncing at all times their deep wrongs, and still contending that justice shall be done them. Mr. Ruffin declared himself to be a Republican, and that intended to follow the fortunes of the Republican party, and was convinced no man in the country better understood Republican principle and acted up to them than Mr. Sumner. Mr. Ruffin urged with much force the blighting effects of the Democratic victory next fall, and thought the convention should not waste its time in creating divisions in the Republican party, but should go to work at once and demand those civil rights that have thus far not been fully accorded to the colored people of this country; that is what this convention was called for and that work alone should occupy its valuable time. "This," said Mr. Ruffin, "is what the Hon. Charles Sumner has been working form and is working for now, white

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