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National Convention at New Orleans, LA

1872LA-National-reports-page16.pdf

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Current Saved Transcription [history]

The gentleman who has just sat down remarked that General, now President, Grant was the only man that could save the colored man. I beg leave to differ with the gentleman. Mr. Grant has no more power to "save" the colored people than Charles Sumner. Who is Mr. Grant? Where was he when Mr. Sumner was fighting and struggling for the colored people? General Grant was not then known but to a small circle of acquaintances, and, sir, I consider the assault upon Mr. Sumner in the Senate chamber an outrage. Like the beautiful and expressive quotation from Shakespeare. "It was the unkindest cut of all," for lo! when they struck Charles Sumner, they struck though the body of every true colored man in the United States. [Applause]

General Grant, it must be remembered, is simply a servant of the people. If he is elected President, I do not doubt but that he will serve to the best of his ability. I was once a warm supporter of Grant. I was one that attended the convention in 1868 and helped to nominate him. I gave him my unwavering support, but since he has occupied his pround position I do not like his administration. I did not and do not think that he gave the attention or done his duty as a Republican to the colored race.

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