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Proceedings of the first convention of colored men of Kentucky held in Lexington, March the 22d, 23d, 24th and 26th, 1866. With the constitution of the Kentucky State Benevolent Association. Printed by order of the convention.

1866 Kentucky State Convention in Lexington.25.pdf

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Current Saved Transcription [history]

23

We have not lost confidence in the President of the United States, we do not believe that he will leave us in the wilderness, but that the pledges made by him while Provisional Governor of Tennessee, and since he has become Chief Magistrate of this Great Republic, will be fulfilled; nor are we without confidence in the General Government and its determination to protect us in our freedom.

We will inculcate in the minds of our people a desire to become landholders; to own a little spot which they may call their own, around which they can gather all the comforts of a home, and have a spot upon which their bones and the ashes of their fathers may be laid away in peace.

We "native and to the manner born;" we are part and parcel of the Great American body politic; we love our country and her institutions; we are proud of her greatness and glory in her might; we are intensely American, allied to the free institutions of our country by the sacrifices, the deaths and the slumbering ashes of our sons, our brothers and our fathers, whose patriotism, whose daring and devotion led them to pledge their lives, their property and their sacred honor, to the maintenance of her freedom, and the majesty of her laws. Here we intend to remain, and while we seek to cultivate all those virtues that shall distinguish us as good and useful citizens, our destiny shall be that of earnest and faithful Americans, and we will recognize no principle, we will allow no doctrine that would make our destiny, other, than the destiny of our native land and our fellow country-men.

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