Search

Search using this query type:



Search only these record types:

Item
Exhibit
Exhibit Page
Simple Page

Advanced Search (Items only)

Scripto | Transcribe Page

Log in to Scripto | Recent changes | View item | View file

Proceedings of the Colored national convention, held in Rochester, July 6th, 7th, and 8th, 1853.

1853NY2of2.26.pdf

« previous page | next page » |

You don't have permission to transcribe this page.

Current Page Transcription [history]

56

and in a portion of that of this country, to eulogize the republican system of government at Liberia, but those who have aproached its shores and taken a near and impartial view of the system give a very different account of it.-- They tell of reckless wars upon the natives attended with both rapine and bloodshed, of legislation framed in a spirit of jealousy and exclusiveness, not much less infamous than that of certain white slaveholding democracies, of commercial regulations most oppressive and restrictive, and that the condition of the natives is worse, rather than better, since the domination of these self-styled pioneers of African civilization. The laws published by their friends, for instance, in the appendix to the report of the Lord's committee on slave trade of last session, support these statements too well to leave doubt as to the truth of what is said of their practical application."

The Liberians justify and connive at all the encroachments of the white foreigners, even to the damage of their own dignity. The whites from other lands have taken possession of every commercial river on the west coast, preparatory to an enforcement of their policy on Africa, for untold generations yet to rise. Have we heard one word of remonstrance from these native whippers? No. A short time since, a white foreign force was marched upon the town of Lagos, within a few degrees of President Roberts' boundary, where, after two days fighting, the town was destroyed, an immense number of natives killed, and the king deposed, &c., &c. Has any remonstrance gone forth, from the government of Liberia? Not a word. Have the papers of the Republic condemned it? No. Has there been a public meeting held in the Republic, to protest against such outrages? None. The reason is obvious, men who live in glass houses cannot afford to throw stones. The truth is, the Liberians are in league with the worst enemies of Africa's dearest interest.

And that the government of Liberia has followed a similar course, with the native towns and chiefs' is shown by the facts in connexion with the recent boasted capture, trial, fine and imprisonment of King Boombo, an affair, which upon strict diplomatic review will prove the following points.

(1.) That President Roberts acted deceitful and cowardly in sending for King Boombo to meet him on the beach, as if to hold a palaver, thus inducing him to come unarmed, when he himself was armed to the very teeth.

(2.) That he has insulted the pride of the native kings of Africa, by trying one of their number, at his petty court of quarter sessions. The idea that the ancient Kings of Africa owe allegiance to his petty government of yesterday, is perfectly ridiculous, and none but a tutelary tyrant would assume it. The fact is, Roberts is prompted by the secret worshippers of African-hating republicans in America.

(3.) That the fine and punishment inflicted upon that King, are of such an extravagant character as to show up the whole case in its own light. To whom is this fifty thousand dollars to go, that will more than pay Roberts' government debt? Cowards always inflict unreasonable punishment. Who is to hold King Boombo's reign of government, during the two years he is imprisoned, and how is he to pay his fine?

One other review and we have finished. We are compelled to regard the Liberians with distrust.

(1.) We have no evidence of their independence, they are evidently yet under the control of the colonization party in this country, and are not trustworthy in their judgment of matters, regarding the race of this country.-- Some time since, the Liberians assembled in public meeting at the courthouse in Monrovia to address the free colored people in the United States, and here are some of the things they say:-- As much speculation and uncertainty continue to prevail among the people of color in the United States respecting our situation, &c. "Tell us," say the Liberians in their address to the free colored people, "which is the white man, who, with a prudent regard for his own character, CAN associate with one of you on terms of equality? Ask us which is the white man, who would decline such association with one of our number, whose intellectual and moral qualities are not an objection? We unhesitatingly answer both these questions by saying, the white man is not to be found." But hear the Liberians in another place: "We solicit none of you

You don't have permission to discuss this page.

Current Page Discussion [history]