Search

Search using this query type:



Search only these record types:

Item
Exhibit
Exhibit Page
Simple Page

Advanced Search (Items only)

Home > Conventions > Transcribe Minutes > Transcribe Page

Scripto | Transcribe Page

Log in to Scripto | Create an account | About the Project | Advanced Instructions | Share your story

Proceedings of the Colored national convention, held in Rochester, July 6th, 7th, and 8th, 1853.

1853NY2of2.12.pdf

« previous page | next page »

This page has been marked complete.

Instructions

DO:

  • Type what you see in the pdf, even if it's misspelled or incorrect.
  • Leave a blank line before each new paragraph.
  • Type page numbers if they appear.
  • Put unclear words in brackets, with a question mark, like: [[Pittsburg?]]
  • Click "Save transcription" frequently!

DON'T:

  • Include hyphens splitting words at the end of a line. Type the full word without the hyphen. If a hyphen appears at the end of a page, type the full word on the second page.
  • Include indents, tabs, or extra spaces.

Current Saved Transcription [history]

42


LETTER FROM J. H. WILSON, M. D.

To the President and Members of the National Convention of Disfranchised American Citizens :

SIRS:—I exceedingly regret that it is out of my power to meet you, in consequence of a press of professional duties; but my whole heart is with you in the advancement of the cause of our condition. I cannot but sincerely wish you God-speed; and, that every delegate will have one ostensible object in view - a sure basis and a firm foundation, whereon you can predicate yourselves. These are peculiar times; and I believe we are upon the eve of some great revolution, and that if ever unanimity and action is regarded of a people, it is now the whole country is concerned about us. Our moral and mental advancement is a subject of wonderment. Our enemies are alarmed, and they continually cry, What shall we do with them? (us.) Let the doings of this Convention settle the question, and be the beginning of a new era in our history; and may He who rules and superrules over destinies, guide you in all your deliberations. Respectfully yours,

J. H. WILSON.


[The following letter was not read at the Convention for want of time:]

LETTER FROM HENRY McKINNEY.

LODERSVILLE, PA., JULY 4, 1853.

To the Convention of People of Color, assembled at Rochester, State of New York:

Being an old Liberty Party man, I take the liberty, and I hope you will grant the privilege, of having this epistle read at your Convention. I have long struggled to make our people feel for your rights, and spent time and money in the struggle. I voted for Hale and Julian ; and if the Lord spares my life, my vote shall always be on the side of freedom. We expect, if our party get into power, (and we do not say when that will be,) to appoint to office in the general government only such persons as are beyond dispute thoroughly imbued with our principles; and that the judges of the United States courts will be of different material. We expect to do away with the Fugitive Bill. We expect to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, and in the territories, and wherever Congress has constitutional power. Then we expect to have no more slave states. We do not, as a party, propose to interfere with slavery in the slave states; but we think then our influence, and the opinion of the world, will be such that said states will abolish slavery. We expect some of our candidates, when elected, will turn traitors under southern promises, and some from their bad inclinations. These things we dread most ; but the power we must have. When ? God only knows. Under such circumstances you may well inquire, what are our brethren, suffering under

You don't have permission to discuss this page.

Current Page Discussion [history]