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Proceedings of the Colored national convention, held in Rochester, July 6th, 7th, and 8th, 1853.

1853NY1of2.14.pdf

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15

were enrolled, and fought, side by side, with the whites, the battles of the Revolution.”

General Jackson, in his celebrated proclamations to the free colored inhabitants of Louisiana, uses these expressions: “Your white fellow-citizens;” and again : “Our brave citizens are united, and all contention has ceased among them.”

FIRST PROCLAMATION.

EXTRACTS.

{HEAD QUARTERS, 7th Military Dis't, Mobile, Sept. 21st, 1814.}

To the Free Colored Inhabitants of Louisiana:

Through a mistaken policy you have heretofore been deprived of a participation in the glorious struggle for national rights, in which your country if engaged.

This no longer shall exist.

As sons of freedom, you are now called on to defend our most inestimable blessings. As Americans, your country looks with confidence to her adopted children for a valorous support. As fathers, husbands, and brothers, you are summoned to rally round the standard of the Eagle, to defend all which is dear to existence.

Your country, although calling for your exertions, does not wish you to engage in her cause without remunerating you for the services rendered.

In the sincerity of a soldier, and in the language of truth, I address you--To every noble-hearted free man of color, volunteering to serve during the present contest with Great Britain, and no longer, there will be paid the same bounty in money and land now received by the white soldiers of the United States, viz: $124 in money, and 160 acres of land. The non-commissioned officers and privates will also be entitled to the same monthly pay and daily rations, and clothes, furnished to any American soldier.


The Major General commanding will select officers for your government from YOUR WHITE FELLOW-CITIZENS. Your non-commissioned officers will be selected from yourselves. Due regard will be to the feelings of freemen and soldiers. As a distinct, independent battalion or regiment, pursuing the path of glory, you will, undivided, receive the applause and gratitude of your countrymen. ANDREW JACKSON,

Major Gen. Commanding.

—Niles' Register, Dec. 3, 1814, Vol. 7, p.205.

SECOND PROCLAMATION.

To the Free People of Color:

Soldiers! when on the banks of the Mobile I called you to take up arms, inviting you to partake the perils and glory of your white fellow-citizens, I expected much from you; for I was not ignorant that you possessed qualities most formidable to an invading enemy. I knew with what fortitude you could endure hunger and thirst, and all the fatigues of a campaign.

I knew well how you lovedy our native country, and that you, as well as ourselves, had to defend what man holds most dear—his parents, wife, children, and property. You have done more than I expected. In addition to the previous qualities I before knew you to possess, I found among you a noble enthusiasm which leads to the performance of great things.

Soldiers! the President of the United States shall hear how praiseworthy was your conduct in the hour of danger, and the representatives of the American people will give you the praise your exploits entitle you to. Your General anticipates them in applauding your noble ardor.

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