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Convention of Colored Newspaper Men Cincinnati, August 4th, 1875, Wednesday A. M.

1875OH-State-Newspaper-Cincinnati_TM_copy-page14.pdf

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Mind relative to the colored people in the South, as evidenced in the disparaging tone of the Northern press, and recent extraordinary utterance of some of our heretofore staunch friends, and the unfinished mission undertaken by the Nation to exalt our race to the standard of American Citizenship; the denial of our rights in certain portions of our country, through the means of a vitiated public sentiment; the indifference manifested by the American people to the shocking outages perpetrated upon us in the south, such as the recent massacre at Vicksburg, during the peaceful celebration of the Ninety ninth Anniversary of American independence, and the consequent demoralization resulting therefrom, taken in connection with the necessity of higher development of our moral, material and political interests, render it in our judgment, essential that we meet in National convention, early in next year to devise mcans? for ‘a more perfect union, ‘such as will consolidate our people, and secure that harmonious action throughout the country on all matters of national interest so needful to a just appreciation of our numbers and influence in the Republic: therefore, be it

“Resolved, That we invite the colored people of the several States and Territories, and of the district of venation hereby called to meet at Nashville, Tennessee, on the first Wednesday of April, 1876, at 12 o’clock, M. upon the following basis of representation: three delegates from each state, and one additional for every twenty- five thousand colored population and fractional District of Columbia, which shall be entitled to four representatives, to wit

Alabama……….23 New York……..6

Arkansas……….8 North Carolina………19

California………4 Ohio………6

Connecticut….4 Oregon………4

Delaware….4 Pennsylvania………6

Florida……...7 Rhode Island……..4

Georgia…….25 South Carolina………20

Illinois……….5 Tennessee……16

Indiana……..4 Texas……..14

Iowa……….…4 Vermont…….4

Kansas………4 Virginia……….24

Kentucky…...12 West Virginia………4

Louisiana……18 Wisconsin……….4

Maine………4 District of Columbia…….5

Maryland……..10 Arizona…….1

Massachusetts……4 Colorado…….1

Michigan……….4 Dakota………1

Minnesota……….4 Idaho……….1

Mississippi………20 Montana……….1

Missouri………8 New Mexico………1

Nebraska………..4 Utah………..1

Nevada…………4 Washington………1

New Hampshire….4 Wyoming……..1

New Jersey………5

Total……………………………………….337


“In order to secure the success of this call, and to have each State and Territory represented in the Convention, your committee recommends the creation of an Executive Committee in each State, which shall have full power in the premises, and to that end submit the following resolution:

“ ‘RESOLVED, That an Executive Committee of three in each State, be appointed by the President of the Convention, who shall constitute sub-committees for their respective States, to carry out the details in the election of delegates to the National Convention, and in appointing the time and designating the manner of elections.’ ”

Mr. Young, of Louisiana, objected to the clause in the preamble of the report referring to the denial of the civil rights of the colored people of the south. He thought enough had been said on that subject, and could see no use of keeping up the same old whine.

Mr. Turner, of Georgia, spoke warmly in favor of retaining the clause. Congress had patched up apology for a Civil Rights Bill,

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