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Slavery in Cuba. A Report of the Proceedings of the Meeting, Held at the Cooper Institute. New York City, December 13, 1872.

1872NY-Cuba-New-York_Proceedings-page22.pdf

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22

The meeting was called to order by Mr. James M. Trotter, and was organized by the selection of Charles E. Pindell, as President, J. M. Trotter, Vice-President, and Peter H. Nott as Secretary. Prayer was offered by Mr. Williams, a student from Andover. Mr. Pindell, on taking the chair, delivered the following address:

Now, that we are confirmed in the possession of our liberty, and have been so bountifully provided with all the requisites of freeman, it ill becomes us to sit idly by, while five hundred thousand of our brethren are held in bondage in the island of Cuba; it only remains for us to rise as a people in our might, express our abhorrence to the abject slavery in which our brethren are held, and their freedom will speedily follow.

Having assembled here, this evening, as our call reads, to take the necessary and proper steps to advance the cause of universal freedom, and to discuss matters relating to the existence of slavery in Cuba, and to the war the Cubans have so gallantly waged for the past four years against their heartless and inhuman oppressors, for the purpose of throwing off the yoke of Spain, gaining their independence, and establishing a Republican form of Government in and for Cuba, it may be interesting to you to be informed of a few facts in relation to their patriotic course, as well as the grossly inhuman, and barbarous course pursued by the Spanish Government.

In 1817, the Spanish Government entered into a treaty with Great Britain, by which, for the sum of four hundred thousand pounds to be paid by Great Britain, Spain agreed to put a stop, on and after May 30, 1820, to the traffic in slaves which Spaniards were carrying on from the coast of Africa. Great Britain honestly fulfilled her part of the treaty, but Spain continued to tolerate the importation of slaves into Cuba, although, occasionally, royal orders were issued by Spain in which the Captains General were urged to prosecute more severely any clandestine importation of slaves. The officers, being aware of the spirit of their Government, finding that the traffic was a source of wealth to themselves, took good care not to too strictly enforce the orders of their superiors. Such gross, open, and scandalous violations of the

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