Search

Search using this query type:



Search only these record types:

Item
Exhibit
Exhibit Page
Simple Page

Advanced Search (Items only)

Scripto | Transcribe Page

Log in to Scripto | Recent changes | View item | View file

Proceedings of the National Emigration Convention of Colored People Held at Cleveland, Ohio, On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, The 24th, 25th, and 26th of August, 1854

1854 Cleveland OH State Convention 22.pdf

« previous page | next page » |

You don't have permission to transcribe this page.

Current Page Transcription [history]

20

to be observed by the Colored People generally of the United States.

4. Resolved, That it is also recommended that set times be appointed by the various denominations among us, for special prayer for the deliverance of our oppressed race from the galling yoke of Slavery.

5. Resolved, That the rendition of men to slavery, is a requisition so criminal and heinous, that the wretch who aids in such an act, should by every colored person, be regarded as a common felon—a highwayman and assassin, and whenever an occasion requires it, by them treated as such.

6. Resolved, That the frequent seizure in the North of colored men, women and children, who are sent into slavery, have measurably alienated our feelings towards this country; dispelled the lingering patriotism from our bosoms, which compels us to regard as our common enemy every white, who proves not himself to the contrary.

7. Resolved, That the bold, determined, manly and independent position taken by Wm. Lloyd Garrison, Esq., Rev. Theodore Parker, Wendall Phillips and Attorney Richard H. Dana, Esquires, and other friends of freedom in Massachusetts, in defence of our victimized brother, Anthony Burns, against the trained bands of armed ruffians—agents of the United States Government—in his late rendition to Slavery by the kidnappers and man-thieves, merit the hearty thanks and encomiums of this Convention.

8. Resolved, That we recommend that hereafter the First Day of January of each year be observed as a day of Celebration, being the anniversary of Haitien Independence.

9. Whereas, we have looked upon the indefatigable labors of the Rev. Charles Avery, in erecting a College for the education of colored youths, as worthy of the gratitude and lasting remembrance of our people: And whereas, in the opinion of this Convention, the work of elevation among us cannot be complete until the education of our sons and daughters for the various pursuits of life have been fully accomplished, thereby fitting them for many high positions in society, either in their places of choice as emigrants, or otherwise:

Therefore, resolved, that this Convention recommend to our people the Allegheny Institute, established in Allegheny city, opposite Pittsburgh, Allegheny county, Pa., as an institution worthy of their

You don't have permission to discuss this page.

Current Page Discussion [history]