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Minutes of the National Convention of Colored Citizens; Held at Buffalo; on the 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th of August, 1843; for the purpose of considering their moral and political condition as American citizens.

1843NY 19.pdf

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[19]

Jason Jeffrey, H. W. Johnson, A. Peek, R. H. Johnson, S. Talbot, E. B. Dunlap, U. Lett, D. Lewis, W. C. Munto, R. Banks, R. Allen—18. Nays—C. Lennox Remond, F. Douglass, James Sharpe, J. P. Morris, R. Francis, W. Johnson, A. Outley, J. F. Platt, G. Weir, W . W. Brown, S. H. Davis, A. M. Sumner, W. Watson, W. H. Yancy, D. Jenkins, G. W. Tucker, H. Jackson, N. W. Jones, Joseph Roxbury—19.

On motion it was resolved that all persons having statistical information respecting our people, report the same to the committee on the condition of the colored people.

The business committee reported a series of resolutions on colonization—the report was accepted.

It was on motion resolved, that the resolutions be taken up separately.

Resolution No. 11 was called up, and after a few remarks explanatory of the resolution was adopted.

Resolution No. 12 was read and adopted without debate.

Resolution No. 13 was then taken up and supported by Mr. Munro, of Mich.—R. H. Johnson rose to reply. Mr. Wright of New York, moved the previous question-the motion was carried—the motion then recurred upon the resolution—it was adopted.

Resolution No. 14 was called up, read and adopted without debate.

Resolution No. 15 was also adopted without debate.

Resolution No. 16 upon Colonization Missionaries was called up and read; this resolution elicited remarks from several gentIemen.—Some of them enquired if the Colonization Society as such, had in fact any Missionaries proper under their control—if they had not, we ought not to infer that they had, and say so as did this resolution; if they had, then the resolution ought to pass in its present form-they further said that there were Missionary operations in and about Liberia, to which this resolution would in truth apply, and they were for so applying it-but they believed those Missionaries were not under the auspices of the Colonization Society. The brethren on the other side said that whether these Missionaries were, or were not directly under the auspices of the Colonization Society, they supported and encouraged it, and threw themselves upon it for protection; and it encouraged-supported, and in some form protected them; and if they were not one in form, they were in fact, and the resolution fitly applied to them. The brethren on the other side admitted that the resolution did apply to them in spirit, all they wanted was that it might be so worded as to apply to them strictly in letter.

Resolution No. 17 was taken up, and adopted without debate.

11. Resolved, That it may be possible that the scheme of American Colonization was originally established upon pure motives; but if it were, its subsequent operations show that it has been fostered and sustained by the murderous spirit of slavery and prejudice.

12 Resolved, That such being the character of the institution, it has neither the confidence or respect of the free people of color of the United States.

13 Resolved, That the manner in which the American Colonization Society secures its victims—to wit, by begging slaveholders to emancipate their slaves, only on condition that they will go to Liberia, shows in what low estimation it should be held by the common sense, and philanthropy of the nation.

14. Resolved, That those professed ministers of the gospel, and professing christians, who believe and declare that the pure gospel cannot elevate our race in this

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