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Minutes of the State Convention of the Colored Citizens of Ohio, Convened at Columbus, Jan. 15th, 16th, 17th and 18, 1851.

1851OH.3.pdf

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259

OHIO, 1851

On motion of H. F. Douglass it was resolved that the Convention hold evening sessions.

On motion of Doct. C. H. Langston, it was resolved that the members of this Convention be allowed to speak only twice to any one question, nor more than ten minutes each time, unless with the consent of the Convention.

Their being no question pending before the Convention the preamble and first resolution were called up.

And on motion of J. T. Ward, of Franklin, the preamble and first resolution was referred to a select committee on one, and Rev. James Poindexter appointed said committee.

The second resolution was then taken up, and on motion of L. D. Taylor, of Franklin, was referred to a select committee of one--Dr. C. H. Langston constituting the same.

The third resolution was taken up and adopted.

The 4th resolution, on motion of J. Mercer Langston, Esq., was made the order of the day for to-morrow, Jan. 16th, 1851.

On motion the 5th resolution was taken up and adopted.

On motion the 6th resolution was taken up, and during its consideration the hour of 5 o'clock P.M., having arrived, the session closed.

Evening Session

The Convention met pursuant to adjournment. The first Vice President in the Chair. The 6th resolution was taken up and discussed, and was amended by motion of C. A. Yancy, as follows: That we strike out all after the word Resolved, and insert the following: That we hold it to be the imperative duty of every delegate who represents the people in our annual Conventions, to bring a full report of all the statistics in the district which he represents. Carried.

The 7th resolution was then taken up and adopted.

The 8th resolution was then taken up, and while it was pending, J. Mercer Langston offered a resolution as a substitute; and while it was pending, on motion of C. A. Yancy, the resolution and substitute were laid on the table.

The 9th resolution was then taken up, and while under consideration, Mr. Barrett, of Franklin, moved to amend as follows--That there be an agent in each Congressional district.

The 10th resolution was then taken up, and after being amended by the insertion of the word "American," was adopted unanimously.

The 11th resolution was indefinitely postponed.

The 12th resolution was taken up and carried.

The 13th resolution was then taken up and adopted.

On motion, the evening session closed by singing the song composed by J. McC. Simpson, entitled that "Liberia is not the place for me."

Morning Session, Columbus, Jan. 16th, 1851

Convention met pursuant to adjournment. President in the Chair. Antislavery song by the Rev. J. McC Simpson. Prayer by Mr. William Hope. In the absence of the Secretary's report of the last meeting, the Convention proceeded to business.

On motion of Chas. A. Yancy, it was resolved that all persons from a distance have all the privileges of the Convention except that of voting.

On motion of Doct. C. H. Langston, it was resolved that no preceding Convention has any power to say who shall or shall not be delegates in a subsequent Convention, who are not elected delegates, which was referred to a select committee of one, L. D. Tayor constituting said committee.

The chairman of the business committee reported sundry resolutions--15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th.

Resolution No. 4, being the order of the day, was then taken up. W. Howard Day was then called on, but excused himself upon the ground of being disinclined to speak under existing circumstances.

After repeated calls, J. Mercer Langston spoke as follows:

"Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Convention!--No enactment ever given birth to by the American Congress has created so much dissatisfaction and excitement, as the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850. This is not to be wondered at when we remember that mankind are not entirely divested of their humanity, and that this enactment possesses neither the form nor the essence of true

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