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Minutes and Proceedings of the Second Annual Convention for the Improvement of the Free People of Color in these United States, held by adjournments in the city of Philadelphia, from the 4th to the 13th of June, inclusive, 1832.

1832PA 15.pdf

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16

Your committee before examining those inquiries, would most respectfully take a retrospective view of the object for which the Convention was first associated, and the causes which have actuated their deliberations.

The expulsory laws of Ohio, in 1829, which drove our people to seek a new home in Upper Canada, and their impoverished situation afterwards, excited a general burst of sympathy for their situation, by the wise and good, over the whole country. This awakened public feeling on their behalf, and numerous meetings were called to raise funds to alleviate their present miseries. The bright prospects that then appeared to dawn on the new settlement, awakened our people to the precariousness of their situations, and, in order more fully to be prepared for future exigencies, and to extend the system of benevolence still further to those who should remove to Upper Canada, a Circular was issued by five individuals, viz:—the Rev. Richard Allen, Cyrus Black, Junius C. Morel, Benjamin Pascal, and James E. Cornish, in behalf of the citizens of Philadelphia, calling a Convention of the colored delegates from the several States, to meet on the 20th day of September, 1830, to devise plans and means for the establishment of a colony in Upper Canada, under the patronage of the general Convention, then called.

That Convention met, pursuant to public notice, and recommended the formation of a parent Society, to be established, with auxiliaries, in the different towns where they had been represented in general Convention, for the purpose of raising monies to defray the object of purchasing a Colony in the province of Upper Canada, for those who should hereafter wish to emigrate thither, and that immediately after its organization, a Corresponding Agent should be appointed to reside at or near the intended purchase.

Our then limited knowledge of the manners, customs, and privileges, and rights of aliens in Upper Canada, together with the climate, soil and productions thereof, rendered it necessary to send out Agents to examine the same, who returned with a favorable report, except that citizens of these United States could not purchase lands in Upper Canada, and legally transfer the same to other individuals.

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