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Hampton Negro Conference. Number III. July 1899.

1899VA-State-Hampton_Proceedings (56).pdf

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55

relationship of the animal, mineral, and vegetable kingdoms, and how utterly impossible it is for one to exist in a highly organized state without the other. Our young people must be encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities. Send your boy to the best agriculture school within your reach, and let him take as much of the two, four or six years' course as he can. Likewise, let your daughter go and learn the technique of poultry raising, dairying, and fruit growing, and landscape gardening. Be a frequent visitor to your nearest experiment station; ask many questions, and note carefully every successful experiment; then go home and try to put the same in practice on your own farm. Read their bulletins, and take one or two agriculture papers; and a stream of prosperity will flow in upon you by reason of the application of this knowledge,that will be to you a very agreeable surprise. In conclusion I would say, attend with your families every farmers meeting or conference,for they are powerful educational factors, and are the keys to the golden doors of your success.

ADDITIONAL HINTS

At the conclusion of Prof. Carver's paper, Mr. Troyer of the Calhoun School rose, and said in part: "There are more teachers here than farmers and the school teacher must become a missionary of agriculture. The land in the south is bare, like the famous cupboard of Mother Hubbard. It must be supplied with food so that when plants are put into it they can find sufficient nourishment. In order to furnish this necessary food the farmer should be advised to plough under leaves of trees, cornstalks, and the like, instead of burning them. The cotton and corn plants ase hungry, like everything else that lives. In common with other plants, they reqnire nitrogen, and this can be most easily and cheaply obtained from leguminous plants, such as cow peas and clover. These draw nitrogen directly from the air and when they are ploughed under, they give it to the soil, which, in turn, feeds it to other plants.

"In the second place I want to say something about pigs. It is the farmer's business to make good pork; if his pork does not command the highest price in the market, he should find out the reason why and apply the remedy. A pig twelve months old ought to weigh two or three hundred pounds; and if he does

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