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Hampton Negro Conference. Number III. July 1899.

1899VA-State-Hampton_Proceedings (38).pdf

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37

home as a bread-winner, (2) ignorance on the part of the parents as to the true needs of the child.

As helpful remedies we suggest:—

First,—Mothers' meetings, to impress the importance of proper home life.

Second,—Girls' meetings, to encourage the development of pure womanhood.

Third,—Voluntary missionaries to give from house to house, needed instruction along the lines presented.

Fourth,—Day nurseries for the care of children whose mothers are compelled to be out at work for the day. For such services a fee of five cents would preserve their independence.

Fifth,—Kitchen garden, sewing, and cooking classes.

Sixth,—Reading circles.

Seventh,—The cultivation of flowers, the adornment of the house, and the maintenance of a cheerful and sympathetic spirit, as a means of retaining the child's affection within the home.

Eighth,—The discouragement on soliciting subscriptions for church and society purposes by means of punch cards, jugs, etc.

It encourages boldness, familiarity, and deception.

Ninth,—That ladies of the conference give their names to this committee as voluntary missionaries to put in operation in their immediate neighborhoods the above mentioned suggestion.

The Woman's Conference opened on Thursday morning with a paper by Miss Lucy Laney, whose simplicity of manner, and evident common sense, won for her many friends. The discussion that followed was earnest and spirited,—one of the very best of the conference.

THE BURDEN OF THE EDUCATED COLORED WOMAN

BY LUCY C. LANEY

PRINCIPAL OF THE HAINES SCHOOL, AUGUSTA, GA.

If the educated colored woman has a burden—and we believe she has—what is that burden? How can it be lightened. how may it be lifted? What it is can be readily seen perhaps better than told, for it constantly annoys to irritation; it bulges out as did the load of Bunyan's Christian—ignorance—with its inseparable companions, shame and crime and prejudice.

That our position may be more readily understood, let us refer to the past; and it will suffice for our purpose to begin with

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