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Proceedings of the Colored State Convention assembled in St. Paul's A. M. E. Church, Lexington, Ky., November 26.

1884KY-State-Lexington_Proceedings (20).pdf

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20

child without providing a proper educator, is poor economy. It is inconsistent." Normal schools should be planted for all; but we pray for ourselves because we have none. Your provisions for the common school must therefore be supplemented by normal schools, or money wasted on incompetent teachers. We have been told to pay no attention to the normal department of the A. & M. College - that it amounted to nothing. By the same report (page 245), we can show that a normal school does exist under the forms of law, though imbedded in an Agricultural and Mechanical College, and no colored person is admitted. We would not refer to this, only we are told so many times that the normal school there is nothing over which to contend. We answer that there is a principle at stake. The Auditor's report (page 5), shows that the State paid in the fiscal year to June 30, 1884, to said college, $17,873.22; and to June 30, 1885, $18,420.30. This money was collected by tax. We may be told that the colored people pay little or none of that, or any other tax. We reply that the State is organized to do through the whole what could be done by the individual - to collect revenues from all alike - and we do not ask to be free from doing our duty, our whole duty, and nothing less than our duty. But let us give the quotation. "The following extracts from the act of the General Assembly incorporating said college (A. & M.), will exhibit the relation between its normal school and the common school system of the Commonwealth. A normal department or course of instruction for regular periods, or exclusively to qualify teachers for common and other schools, shall be established in connection with the college; and those students who attain to the requisite proficiency as teachers, in the opinion of the academic board, shall be furnished by the college with a certificate to that effect, setting forth, in such case, the various branches in which the student is qualified; and such certificate shall be evidence of qualification to teach in the public schools of the State in the various branches named, without further qualification. Those teachers or persons preparing to teach may be admitted free of tuition charge for one year, at the rate of not more than four, at the discretion of the Board of Trustees for each legislative representative district." We ask you to note that a State certificate is granted to graduates, a thing

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