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Proceedings of the State Colored Educational Convention Held at Frankfort, Kentucky, August 22, 1877

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Proceedings of the State Colored Educational Convention Held at Frankfort, Kentucky, August 22, 1877

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Pamphlet (14 p. ; 23 cm.)

Date

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Courtesy of The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

Facsimile

Identifier

1877.KY-08.22.FRAN

Coverage

Frankfort, KY

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Transcription

PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

STATE COLORED

EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION

HELD AT

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY,

AUGUST 22, 1877

FRANKFORT, KY.:

PRINTED AT THE KENTUCKY YEOMAN OFFICE

S. I. M. MAJOR, PUBLIC PRINTER.

1877.

page left blank

PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

STATE COLORED

EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION

HELD AT

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY,

AUGUST 22, 1877

FRANKFORT, KY.:

PRINTED AT THE KENTUCKY YEOMAN OFFICE

S. I. M. MAJOR, PUBLIC PRINTER.

1877.

PROCEEDINGS.

FRANKFORT, KY., August 22, 1877.

Pursuant to a call made by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, quite a number of leading colored educators from various parts of the State met in Convention in the above-named city.

The Convention assembled in the courthouse at 10 o'clock, A.M., and was called to order by Dr. Henderson, who, in stating the object of the Convention, said that he had called the Convention in order to organize, under the Common School Laws, an Educational Association that should be perfectly free from all sectarian and political influences, and whose aim should be to secure an improvement of the teachers by union of effort, and also to ascertain the real wants of the colored race, and to respectfully lay before the Legislature of Kentucky the necessities and desires of the colored citizens. He said that the movement had met with great favor from representative men of both races; that he had received a great number of letters from colored teachers throughout the State, who expressed great regret that they could not be present on the very important occasion.

The Doctor made many other very important remarks, all of which were cordially received and heartily cheered by the members of the Convention.

After which, Messrs. J.H. Jackson, of Lexington, Kentucky, was elected temporary Chairman, and C.C. Vaughn, Secretary.

Mr. Jackson, on taking the chair, made a few remarks, in which he thanked the Convention for the distinguished honor conferred upon him. He fully assured all of the interest he had in the advancement of education in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

He presided over the body with grace and dignity, and with entire satisfaction to the Convention. He is a gentleman of scholarly attainment, a graduate of Berea College, and Principal of one of the colored schools in Lexington, Kentucky.

4

PROCEEDINGS OF THE

On motion, proceeded to enroll the names of teachers and members to compose the Association:

Dr. H.A.M. Henderson, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Frankfort, Kentucky.

MALE TEACHERS.

J. H. Jackson, Lexington, Kentucky.

C. C. Vaughn, Russelville, Kentucky.

J. M. Maxwell, Louisville, Kentucky.

W. H. Gibson, Louisville, Kentucky.

A . Allensworth, Bowling Green, Kentucky.

P. H. Edwards, Bowling Green, Kentucky.

T. G. Thompson, Frankfort, Kentucky.

J. K. Mason, Henderson, Kentucky.

E. Griggsby, Paris, Kentucky.

W. H. McRidley, Lagrange, Kentucky.

G. D. P. Rucker, Paducah, Kentucky.

Jas. Thomas, Franklin, Kentucky

W. H. Roberson.

Lewis Sublit, Hopkinsville,Kentucky.

E. P. Marrs, Shelbyville, Kentucky.

FEMALE TEACHERS.

C. V. Farris, Frankfort, Kentucky.

E. B. Jackson, Lexington, Kentucky.

Lue Frazier, Paris, Kentucky.

Lucy Smoots, Paris, Kentucky.

Mattie Anderson, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Sarah Smith, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Katy Thomas, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Lizzie Hocker, Frankfort, Kentucky.

G. Hollins, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Mariah Williams, Lexington, Kentucky.

TRUSTEES.

M.C. Johnson, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Preston Graves, Frankfort, Kentucky.

R. H. Higdon, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Jas. Turner, Lexington, Kentucky.

G. H. Steamer, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Jno. Rickets, Danville, Kentucky.

STATE COLORED EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION 5

Jas. Allensworth, Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

S . P. Cheatem, Old Camp, Cumberland county, Kentucky.

P. Morgan, Hopkinsville, Kentucky.

Adam Withers, Danville, Kentucky.

HONORARY MEMBERS

Rev. Geo. W. Dupee, Paducah, Kentucky.

Rev. R. Martin, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Rev. C. Stumm, Portland, Kentucky.

Rev. Jas. Parris, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Rev. Wm. Gray, Lexington, Kentucky.

Mr. Peter Smith, Frankfort, Kentucky.

PERMANENT ORGANIZAT!ON

Mssrs. J. M. Maxwell, Jas. Turner, and J.R. Mason were appointed by the Chair as a Committee on Permanent Organization.

While the Committee were out preparing their report, the Convention was addressed by Mr. Wm. H. Gibson, sr., of Louisville, who made some very pointed and interesting remarks.

The Committee soon returned, bearing the following report as permanent officers for the ensuing year:

President—J. H. JACKSON, Lexington, Kentucky.

Vice President—J. M. MAXWELL, Louisville, Kentucky.

Secretary—C.C. VAUGHN, Russellville, Kentucky.

Treasurer—P. SMITH, Frankfort, Kentucky.

The report of the Committee was adopted, and immediately afterward, by request of the Convention, Dr. H. A. M. Henderson invoked the Divine blessing upon the assembly.

On motion, all teachers were order take seats within the bar.

The following gentlemen were appoint a Committee on Constitution and By-laws:

J.K. Mason, Chairman; A. Allensworth, W. H. Gibson, Jno. Rickets, Peter Smith, W. H. McRidley, and Rev. G. W. Dupee.

While the Committee were preparing a Constitution, Prof. J. M. Maxwell addressed the Convention very appropriately for the occasion, as follows:

6 PROCEEDINGS OF THE

MR. PRESIDENT AND MEMBERS OF THE CONVENTION: I am in favor of the organization of a Colored Teachers' State Educational Association for several reasons. And, first, I advocate it because of the importance of the great work of educating the people of this Commonwealth, with whom I am identified nationally and socially; and because such an organization would, in my judgment, diffuse a spirit of sympathy and co-operation which would render more efficient and thorough the progress of education among the colored people in our State. Wherever, in any community, an opportunity for acquiring an education is afforded, it is universally acknowledged to be the duty of the citizens of that community to avail themselves of that opportunity. Hence it follows that the judgment which enlightened humanity has passed upon ignorance is that it is a "malum in se." Since it is true that ignorance is an evil in itself, it follows that it is an evil still, it matters not in whom it may be found, nor what the cause of its existence may be.

But, lest my utterance be misunderstood, l will go further and say, that ignorance in those who have had the opportunity of obtaining knowledge is not only an evil, but it is a crime, and its possessor deserves the punishment which is almost sure to follow. Ignorance in those who have not had an opportunity for acquiring an education is still an evil, but not a crime with which they are chargeable. The sin of their ignorance lies not at their doors. For those who have been and are still thus unfortunate I have heartfelt, sincere, and unbounded sympathy, for I know that there are many pleasures which they can never feel—many flowers in God's intellectual garden whose beauty they can never see, whose fragrance they can never inhale; many fruits growing on the vast trees of knowledge whose sweetness: they can never taste. But I rejoice that the prospect is so bright for the coming of that day when in every county, township, and village of this beautiful and rich Commonwealth the portals of knowledge shall be opened; when an opportunity for acquiring a knowledge of the elements of a good English education shall be afforded to the humblest child of the State; when from Kentucky as a centre to earth's remotest bounds there shall spread the light of a new and more exalted life in the world of mind and heart.

STATE COLORED EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION 7

Connected as I am with the educational interests of the colored children of the metropolis of our State, in which the facilities for acquiring an education are so excellent, and which reflect a halo of unfading glory upon the heads of the members of the Board of School Trustees, the Board of Visitors, and the good citizens of Louisville generally, it may be that l am a little too sanguine in the hopes which I entertain for the future. God forbid! I know that the colored children in the rural and sparsely inhabited districts labor under disadvantages to which the children in our cities are strangers, disadvantages which I believe will ere long be removed. The history of the ages that are past has begun to convince the nations of the earth that to make liberal provisions for the education of the people is national economy instead of political extravagance; and never in the world's history has the cause of general education been espoused so universally as at the present time.

The States of our Union have caught the spirit and are making liberal appropriation; and whenever the citizens of the rural districts are convinced that all the better interests of the community will be subserved by educating the children of that community, they will cheerfully vote for the local taxation necessary for the maintenance of their public schools.

It seems to be an opinion of some of our people that, as the property of the country school districts is owned chiefly by the white citizens they will not consent to be taxed for the purpose of providing funds for the liberal education of the colored children. Such is certainly not true of the city of Louisville, and I believe that there are good men—warm-hearted, philanthropic men—in every school district in the State, who need only to be convinced that the colored people of these districts will rightly appreciate and fully improve the opportunities of an education, in order to secure their consent that such opportunity shall be afforded. There are those in Louisville who once bitterly opposed the appropriation for the colored schools of that city, but who, having witnessed the progress the children have made, are now numbered among our warmest friends; and so it will be wherever the experiment is tried. And an association of the most intelligent colored citizens of the State, organized in the interest of educational work among our people, and known as

8 PROCEEDINGS OF THE

an educational association, will constitute a power that will wield an influence in molding public sentiment in our favor, and develop a faith on the part of the white population which will create that conviction of which I have spoken--a conviction whose fruits will soon be seen in the erection of comfortable school-houses for the education of colored children in every district wherein they are found; and because of my faith in this as a final result, I have come hither to-day for the purpose of contributing what influence my presence might give, and what force my words might have in effecting the organization of any association, such as was contemplated in the call of our honorable State Superintendent of Public Instruction. While I regret that there are no more present, I am pleased to have met so many of my fellow-laborers, who manifest by their presence, and who will doubtless manifest by their words, that they are in sympathy with the cause we advocate. We should not be discouraged if our beginning is small; such is the law of development in all organic life. The mighty oak was an acorn once. The mayflower once cradled the republic, but now contemplates its teeming million! And as I turn my ear to catch the sound of faith's whisperings of the future, "I hear the tread of millions yet to come." And so will our Association increase in number and interest in proportion to our endeavors to make it worthy of growth and patronage.

Besides the good which this Association, if organized, may accomplish in the way of disseminating the seeds of knowledge in localities hitherto untouched by the teacher's hand, it will have a tendency to increase the stores of our own knowledge, and make us more efficient in dressing the vines of our several vineyards; for it matters not how much one may know, if he would present to his pupils food adapted to the growth of mind, he must present it while it is fresh and sweet to the mental taste, and to do this, he must needs himself to draw fresh supplies from those streams of living truths which flow all over the broad fields of science. To meet together and discuss questions of science and art bearing directly upon the success of the work in which we are engaged will increase in us a hungering and thirsting after more knowledge; for we never so sensibly feel our want of knowledge as when we are called upon to enlighten

9

STATE COLORED EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION.

others; and feeling this want, if we are worthy of our calling, we will seek to have it fully supplied.

While the great heart of the intellectual world is throbbing with emotion, our hearts must "responsive beat." We should not be passive recipients, continually feasting upon thoughts of others; we should be authors of original thought, and eat of the food prepared by our own hands.

Poor Lazarus was excusable for eating the crumbs that fell from the rich man's table because of his sore afflictions; but we will not be excusable for thus acting, in an intellectual point of view, because it is in our power to set tables of our own; and though they may not be spread with dainty viands, the food will be pleasant to our tastes; and adapted to the growth of our minds, because of its kindred nature.

The mind does not grow strong so much by what it receives as by what it gives. It was this outgoing of thought more than the incoming of knowledge that gave to the minds of Demosthenes, Cicero, Socrates, and Plato their great power and caused them to shine as stars in the galaxy of ancient lore. They did not, it may be, possess a knowledge of as many facts of history and of science in general as many of our school boys and girls, at the age of twelve years, but the facts they knew were pressed into constant service, and thus, by the contact of mind with mind, they became great. And so must we do, fellow-teachers, if we would ennoble our profession, and leave behind us for those who follow a rich legacy in the shining, imperishable world of letters.

But, Mr. President, I have detained your body sufficiently long, and will now give way to others who may desire to be heard upon this subject. I thank you for your attention.

Following the address of Mr. Maxwell, remarks befitting the occasion were made by Messrs. M. C. Johnson, J. Turner, and T. G. Thompson.

The Committee came in while the last speaker was on the floor, and he gave way to hear the report.

A committee of seven were appointed to draft resolutions, viz: Messrs: Wm. Gray, M. C. Johnson, H. Samuels, James Turner, P. Morgan, J. M. Maxwell, and James Thomas.

10 PROCEEDINGS OF THE

After which, the following full and explicit Constitution and set of By-laws were submitted to the Convention. The Constitution was adopted with but few changes, and the By-laws as a whole, without discussion:

CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I.

This organization shall he known as the Colored Teacher's State Educational Association of Kentucky.

SEC. I. The officers of this Association shall consist of a President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer, who shall hold their offices for one year.

SEC. 2. The. President shall be elected by ballot, and the candidate receiving a majority of all the votes cast shall be declared President.

SEC. 3. The Vice President and Secretary may be elected by ballot in the same manner as the President, or by a viva voce vote, but must receive a majority of all the votes to constitute an election.

SEC. 4. The Treasurer shall be elected by ballot in the same manner as the President.

ARTICLE II.

SEC. I. It shall be the duty of the President to preside at all meetings of the Association, to appoint all standing committees, and to perform such other duties as usual pertain to a presiding officer.

SEC. 2 In the absence of the President, the Vice President shall discharge the duties of that officer; and in the absence of both these officers, a President pro tempore may be chosen by the Association.

SEC 3. The Secretary shall keep full minutes of all regular or called meetings of the Association; and after they have been approved, the minutes shall be accurately recorded in a book kept for that purpose, which shall be the property of the Association. The Secretary may also correspond with other Associations; and it shall be his duty to secure copies of their proceedings when printed; to procure copies of all documents, State and Federal, printed for public information; and books and pamphlets thus obtained shall become the property of the

11

STATE COLORED EDUCATIONAL, CONVENTION.

Association; but no person desiring to do so, though not a member of the Association, shall be debarred the privilege of examining any public document in the custody of the Secretary.

SEC. 4. The treasurer shall keep all moneys belonging to the Association deposited in bank subject to his order, and shall keep a careful account of all moneys received and paid out; but no money shall be paid from the Treasury except by approval of the finance committee.

ARTICLE III.

SEC 1. The President, on his election, shall appoint three standing committees:

1. A committee of three on programme.

2. A committee of one on printing.

3. A committee of three on finance.

4. A committee on transportation.

SEC. 2. The committee on programme shall as soon after appointment as practicable announce the programme of exercises. At each meeting the committee shall announce the exercises of the next (see By-laws, section 3); and each exercise must have a designated time in which it shall be given.

SEC. 3 The committee on printing shall contract for the publication of all notices of the meetings of the Association, and of such other matter as the Association may order to be printed.

SEC. 4. It shall be the duty of the finance committee to examine the books of the Treasurer from time to time, and report upon the same at the end of each year, and at such other time as may be deemed proper.

SEC. 5. The Constitution may be amended at any session of the Association by the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present.

BY-LAWS.

SEC. 1. The regular meetings of this Association shall be held on the first Wednesday in August of each year, and at such other times as the Association may direct.

SEC. 2. The regular annual meeting for the election of officers shall be held on Thursday night during the week in which the Association is held; and such exercises my follow the election

12 PROCEEDINGS OF THE

as the committee on programme may have reported at the next preceding meeting.

SEC. 3. At each regular meeting of the Association, except that for the election of officers, the following shalI be the

ORDER OF EXERCISES.

1. Call to order by the President, and opening exercises.

2. Roll call.

3. Minutes of last meeting read and approved.

4. Exercises according to programme of the committee.

5. Committee report of the programme for the next meeting.

6. Reports of other committees.

7. Appointment of place of next meeting upon motion of any member.

8. Miscellaneous business.

9. Adjournment.

SEC. 4. The following shall be the order of exercises for the meeting for the election officers:

1. Call to order and opening exercises.

2. Roll call.

3. Election of officers.

4. Programme of the committee.

5. Adjournment.

SEC. 5. The regular yearly fee to be paid by each member of the Association shall be fifty cents.

SEC. 6. Special committees on any subject may be appointed at any time, on motion of any member, under the head of "miscellaneous business."

SEC. 7. Any teacher or trustee of the State, or such other persons as the Association may elect, may become a member of this Association by signing the Constitution and paying the regular fee.

SEC. 8. Any person may become an honorary member of this Association by vote of a majority of the members present, but no honorary member shall be entitled to a vote; nor shall any actual teacher of this State be admitted as an honorary member.

On motion, the Association was titled, "The Colored Teachers' State Education Association of Kentucky," and the admission fee put at fifty centers per annum for each member thereof;

STATE COLORED EDUCATlONAL CONVENTION. 13

and the first Wednesday in August of each year set apart to hold its annual meeting.

The Committee on Resolutions submitted the following, which was unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That the teachers and trustees of each county be requested to immediately organize a County Teachers' Association," an Institute auxiliary to the State Association, and to send delegates to this General Association at its next annual meeting.

Resolved, That the thanks of this Association are due to Dr. Henderson for manifesting so much interest in the education of the colored children of the State as to call this Convention, and take so active a part in the organization of this Association; that in him we believe the cause of education, irrespective of race or color, has a firm and valuable friend.

Louisville, Danville, and Lexington were put in nomination as places for holding the next annual meeting. Before the vote was taken the meeting adjourned until 3 o'clock, P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

Pursuant to adjournment, the Association reassembled at the Court-house, President in the chair.

Prayer offered by Elder J. Turner, of Lexington.

On motion, the places in nomination before noon were discarded and a renomination made, to-wit: Danville, Louisville, Paris, and Lexington.

After some discussion, the vote was taken, which resulted in the choice of Danville, Kentucky.

The chair having announced Danville to be the place of next meeting, on motion, it was made unanimous.

At half-past four o'clock Dr. H. A. M. Henderson addressed the Association at length, giving in his judgment the best way the colored people may attain the end set forth by the Convention

On motion, the following committees were appointed. Committee on Programme—A. Allensworth, Chairman; Bowling Green, Kentucky; J. M. Maxwell, Louisville, Kentucky; C. C. Vaughn, Louisville, Kentucky.

14 PROCEEDINGS OF THE

Committee on Finance—P. Smith, Chairman, Frankfort, Kentucky; E. Grigsby, Paris, Kentucky; P. H. Edwards, Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Committee on Transportation—J. K. Mason, Chairman, Henderson, Kentucky; G. D. P. Rucker, Paducah, Kentucky; Dr. H. A. M. Henderson, Frankfort, Kentucky.

Committee on Printing. Dr. H. A. M. Henderson.

A vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. Lawler for the use of the Court-house.

On motion, adjourned to meet in Danville the first Wednesday in August, 1878.

J. H. JACKSON, President

C. C. Vaughn, Secretary

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION,

FRANKFORT, KY., Sept. 1st, 1877. }

To Commissioners of Common Schools:

By a resolution of the Colored State Convention you were requested to form County Institutes and Associations, to be composed of the teachers and trustees of colored common schools, and such representative friends of education whose co-operation is deemed desirable.

The Superintendent has considered this matter, and concluded to direct that, in those counties where colored schools are sufficiently numerous, Institutes and Associations should be formed, under the statutes. In counties where ten teachers and the trustees can be gotten together, these Institutes and Associations should be formed. I do not deem it desirable to exact any matriculation fee of the members in organizing. Try and secure voluntary conductors of these Institutes and Associations. Doubtlessly, the white teachers of your respective counties will co-operate cheerfully with you, as this is a field inviting the philanthropic spirit to exercise. Should you propose to organize an Institute, inform me of your purpose, and I will send you circulars announcing it.

Respectfully,

H. A. M. Henderson, Superintendent of Public Instruction

YEOMAN BOOK BINDERY.

WE HAVE OPENED, IN CONNECTION WITH OUR

PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT,

A FIRST-CLASS

BOOK BINDERY,

AND

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTORY,

AND ARE PREPARED TO

EXECUTE ALL ORDERS AS PROMPTLY, NEATLY, AND CHEAPLY,

AS THE

BEST BINDERIES EAST OR WEST.

WE KEEP IN STOCK, OR MAKE PROMPTLY TO ORDER, ON THE

BEST BRANDS OF PAPER, THE FULL LINE OF

BLANK BOOKS

USED BY

COUNTY OFFICERS,

BANKERS, MERCHANTS, AND BUSINESS MEN,

SEND FOR ESTIMATES ON ANY WORK DESIRED AND SAVE MONEY.

MAJOR, JOHNSTON, & BARRETT,

FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY.

THE

KENTUCKY SCHOOL-LAWYER

BY

H. A. M. HENDERSON, Superintendent of Public Instruction,

IS A COMPLETE COMMENTARY ON THE

SCHOOL LAWS OF KENTUCKY AND THE RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.

IT IS WRITTEN IN SUCH PLAIN, EXPLANATORY language that no one can fail to understand the law. it is a book of 325 pages, bound in Muslin, lettered in gold, and handsomely embossed. Price, post-paid $1 25.

Address E.C. Went, Frankfort, Ky.

THE ECLECTIC TEACHER

A MONTHLY EDUCATIONAL JOURNAL PUB-lished at Carlisle, Kentucky, and edited by T. C. H. Vance, W. H. Campbell and H. A. M. Henderson. Official organ of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. TERMS: $1 a year.

Convention Minutes Item Type Metadata

Convention Type

State

Region

South

Meeting Place Name

Frankfort Court House

Uniform Title

1877 Frankfort KY State Educational Convention

Citation

State Colored Educational Convention (1877 : Frankfort, KY, KY), “Proceedings of the State Colored Educational Convention Held at Frankfort, Kentucky, August 22, 1877,” ColoredConventions.org, accessed June 25, 2017, http://coloredconventions.org/items/show/550.